Perfect Fall Planting Weather

1. Perfect Fall Planting Wea...

Your favorite nursery might have a large seed rack with notations like this one: They also should have a number of starts of excellent brassicas, greens, leeks and other fall and winter vegetables. Does that clue you in? Now is the...
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2. Saving Seeds, Planting No...

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Perfect Fall Planting Weather

Your favorite nursery might have a large seed rack with notations like this one:

Seed rack

They also should have a number of starts of excellent brassicas, greens, leeks and other fall and winter vegetables.

Does that clue you in? Now is the perfect time to get many fall and winter vegetables in the ground.

I’ve just transplanted my Roodnerf Brussels sprouts starts, and I purchased a six-pack of Rubine sprouts for a little variety. I also have rapini — broccoli raab — going in, as well as kohlrabi and two types of kale. All those are starts that are 4-6 inches tall and have just a handful of leaves.

Right now you can start beets from seed, direct-sown in the soil. A few weeks ago I planted three types of beets, just a half-row of each. Then last weekend I filled out the row, while thinning the baby beets to wider spacing. I also added a handful of radishes, planted on a grid 4 inches apart.

Soon it will be time to plant overwintering carrots. My favorite variety is Merida, which you can see from the picture is available in stores. I want the carrots to get a few sets of leaves before winter, and then they’ll go into stasis surrounded by a nice mulch. In spring, they’ll shoot up and give me a very early, sweet and crisp harvest.

Brassicas, of course, are the star of our winter garden, and transplants of many types and varieties can be set out now. Sprouting broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and collards can go in.

Many greens can be planted now. How about a nice big batch of spinach? Make sure to amend the bed with lots of compost when seeding that in. Also sow Asian and European greens in succession for the next month to get a continual salad harvest up to Thanksgiving.

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